“A journal that puts high stock in quality literature with some meat on its bones that you can really chew”

The Review Review

“Annoyingly awesome”

NewPages

Current issue

Issue 17 – Spring/Summer 2017

Issue 17 features 104 pages of outstanding fiction and poetry, an essay on the unknown side of Jerome K. Jerome, and interviews with Vera Chok and Oscar Schwartz.

Read more | Buy now

Review: ‘Counternarratives’ by John Keene

John Keene’s Counternarratives is a story collection quite unlike anything I have read before. It spans centuries and explores both American continents. At first the prose seems overly dense—initially I had to wade through quite astonishing levels of detail to uncover what I consider the most important part of fiction: human empathy and the characters it is manifested in—but in the end it succeeds because it layers the reader in historical detail and geographical reference, establishing a firm and distinct sense of place through concrete realism and vivid imagery. Writing about the book for The Barnes & Noble Review, Christopher Byrd put it well when he said that “you first need to learn the broad outlines of the project before you can begin to appreciate its particulars”.

The first section of Counternarratives bounces throughout the Americas. It encompasses discovery (Mannahatta, the opening story of the collection, is a short tale of stumbling upon a new shore, and a fitting metaphor for the reader to begin this literary journey across thousands of miles and hundreds of years), the struggle for freedom (An Outtake From The Ideological Origins Of The American Revolution introduces us to Zion, a slave born in Massachusetts with no desire to stay there), and a test of faith (encountered by Joaquim D’Azevado during his time at Alagoas in A Letter Of The Trials On The Counterreformation In New Lisbon). The stories are told in the third person, which creates a consistent sense of narrative, but the time-spanning nature of Keene’s writing in this opening third of the book often serves to remove the reader from the individual moments: we become observers from an omniscient distance rather than an intimate perspective.

This changes in the final pages of Gloss, Or The Strange History Of Our Lady Of The Sorrows, where the story of Carmel transitions into a first person narrative. Gloss spans seventy-four pages, telling us of Carmel’s quiet life as a slave, and plays host to some of the strongest passages of writing from the collection, most notably the final two pages of the story. The shift to first person towards the end of Gloss focuses us, finally, on a character, and this gives so much life to the ending of Section I.

Keene continues this first person approach as we begin Section II with The Aeronauts, a story which follows Theodore, a young African American working in a research branch of the military during the Civil War in 1861. The descriptions are noticeably less dense, as we view them through a character’s eyes rather than a narrator’s. Theodore shares his own opinions with the reader, communicating his internal conflicts of sexuality and masculinity, as well as an awareness of daily racial tensions. This shift to the subjective narrative continues throughout the middle third of the book, giving the reader a valuable and rich insight into an often ignored voice.

By the halfway mark, it becomes apparent that Counternarratives is attempting to engage us with a struggle for black identity; almost every single story involves the efforts of black characters to make their way in the world despite all that stands before them. While the feelings of dislocation and alienation ripple throughout the collection, and while these may be interpreted by each and every reader uniquely, Keene’s collection seems determined to show us a certain type of struggle: that of minorities’ marginalised identities. Keene’s detailed understanding of time and place, and the personas he employs, aids in uniting historical fact with human empathy in a way which I feel can only be done through fiction.

Counternarratives
Author: John Keene
Publication Date: 6 April 2016
Published by: Fitzcarraldo Editions
ISBN: 1910695130

John Oxnard is based in Cheltenham, and studied Creative Writing at the University of Gloucestershire. He usually dabbles with magic realism when he has the itch to write and has had short stories published in the Compass: New Writing IV and Reflections: New Writing 5 anthologies.

>> In the mood for more news, reviews and interviews? Head to the blog.

Mailing list

Instagram


Vaguely literary things we’ve been enjoying

Librivox

I’m a big fan of audiobooks – a great way to enjoy stories when it isn’t possible to pick up a book – and Librivox has a great catalogue. The works on offer are out of (US) copyright and are free to download, though they do advise you to check the copyright status in your own country before downloading. Anyone can volunteer to record (either solo, or as part of a collaboration), and there’s a friendly and knowledgeable bunch of people who help with things such as ‘proof listening’. I read for them a few years ago and had great fun collaborating on Pliny’s Natural History and some of James Boswell’s work. Reading aloud does make you consider the text very closely, I’ve found. — Elaine

People Reading

people reading-smlA blog I’ve been reading for ten years – indeed, since it started! – is People Reading. In each post, Sonya Worthy snaps a photo of someone on the street reading a book. She then interviews them briefly and finds out what they’re reading and why. It’s one of my favourite sites on the internet. I’ve discovered gems I would never otherwise have found, such as God’s Bits of Wood by Ousmane Sembène. People are always presented as readers first and foremost; she rarely delves into their private lives, unlike more modern sites such as Humans of New York. It’s lovely to see so many people out and about reading.

— Nat

FutureLearn

shakespeare-futurelearnFutureLearn works with unis and cultural institutions around the world to create courses on some pretty interesting topics – all for free – from the comfort of your laptop or smartphone. They’re super accessible and are a great way to intro yourself to or brush up on subjects when you’re short on time and juggling other projects. I’m currently enjoying their course on Hans Christian Andersen with the Uni of Southern Denmark. Next up on my list is their Shakespeare course run by my old uni lecturer Jonathan Bate.

— Sarah

>> Check out the VLTWBE archive here.