“A journal that puts high stock in quality literature with some meat on its bones that you can really chew”

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Current issue

Issue 17 – Spring/Summer 2017

Issue 17 features 104 pages of outstanding fiction and and poetry, an essay on the unknown side of Jerome K. Jerome, and interviews with Vera Chok and Oscar Schwartz.

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Forward Prize nominations for 2017

Choosing the poems we nominate for the annual Forward Prize for Poetry is tricky. The poems that make it into the magazine are already the cream of the crop, and we have come to know them very well over the course of the submission call discussions, as well as though editing and typesetting. We understand the way they ebb and flow. It’s hard to be objective, and we’re really not.

This year’s nominations all come from Issue 17. In no particular order, they are:

  • ‘Kindnesses’ by Daniel Bennett
  • ‘Black Sears’ by Christine Nguyen
  • ‘Burning the Clocks’ by Robert Selby

Those who made it out to the Issue 17 launch were lucky enough to hear ‘Kindnesses’ and ‘Burning the Clocks’ in person.

Good luck to each!

>> In the mood for more news, reviews and interviews? Head to the blog.

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Vaguely literary things we’ve been enjoying

Librivox

I’m a big fan of audiobooks – a great way to enjoy stories when it isn’t possible to pick up a book – and Librivox has a great catalogue. The works on offer are out of (US) copyright and are free to download, though they do advise you to check the copyright status in your own country before downloading. Anyone can volunteer to record (either solo, or as part of a collaboration), and there’s a friendly and knowledgeable bunch of people who help with things such as ‘proof listening’. I read for them a few years ago and had great fun collaborating on Pliny’s Natural History and some of James Boswell’s work. Reading aloud does make you consider the text very closely, I’ve found. — Elaine

People Reading

people reading-smlA blog I’ve been reading for ten years – indeed, since it started! – is People Reading. In each post, Sonya Worthy snaps a photo of someone on the street reading a book. She then interviews them briefly and finds out what they’re reading and why. It’s one of my favourite sites on the internet. I’ve discovered gems I would never otherwise have found, such as God’s Bits of Wood by Ousmane Sembène. People are always presented as readers first and foremost; she rarely delves into their private lives, unlike more modern sites such as Humans of New York. It’s lovely to see so many people out and about reading.

— Nat

FutureLearn

shakespeare-futurelearnFutureLearn works with unis and cultural institutions around the world to create courses on some pretty interesting topics – all for free – from the comfort of your laptop or smartphone. They’re super accessible and are a great way to intro yourself to or brush up on subjects when you’re short on time and juggling other projects. I’m currently enjoying their course on Hans Christian Andersen with the Uni of Southern Denmark. Next up on my list is their Shakespeare course run by my old uni lecturer Jonathan Bate.

— Sarah

>> Check out the VLTWBE archive here.